Fifth Grade
   
 

Religion

  • State the roles of the three Divine Persons
  • Define the names “Jesus” and “Christ”
  • Describe the rites of the seven sacraments
  • Learn the Beatitudes and give examples of living them
  • List qualities of good friendship
  • Define sexuality
  • Practice the Corporal and Spiritual Works of Mercy
  • Explain God’s covenant with the Israelites
  • List the evangelists
  • Define the word ‘gospel’
  • Locate Scriptures in the Old and New Testament
  • Recognize God as the judge of our lives
  • State that prayer is talking and listening to God
  • State different ways to pray
  • Learn the Nicene Creed
  • Learn the Stations of the Cross
  • Explain redemption
  • List ways the Holy Spirit empowers us to continue the saving work of Jesus Christ
  • Explain and give examples of the four marks of the Church
  • Recognize the Liturgical calendar
  • Explain that Catholic means universal – open to all
  • Explain why the Church is the sacrament of Christ in the world
  • Define ecumenism
  • List the Holy Days of Obligation
  • Identify the signs of each sacrament
  • Categorize the sacraments
  • Identify personal examples of how grace has gifted us through the sacraments
  • State that it is our choice to live as faithful followers of Jesus
  • Explain the difference between mortal and venial sin
  • List reasons why Mary is a Saint (i.e., Annunciation, Immaculate Conception)
  • Identify the Assumption of Mary as a sign of hope
  • Highlight the way the Church honors Mary

Science

  • Understand that repeated scientific investigations may give slightly different results and should be replicable
  • Know that an experiment must be repeated many times and yield constant results before being accepted
  • Understand the importance of communication among scientists
  • Use strategies to review, compare and contrast, and critique scientific investigations
  • Use sketches, diagrams, and models to compare objects to each other, to compare objects to reality and to propose scientific solutions to problems
  • Understand that increasing the average motion of the particles increases the temperature
  • Understand that mass is the amount of material in an object know that matter takes up space and has mass and that although it may be invisible, it still exists
  • Differentiate between mass and weight as they pertain to gravity
  • Explain the law of conservation of matter
  • Use scientific tools to measure speed, distance, and the direction of the object: stopwatch, meter stick, compass describe the structure of an atom
  • Know and understand Newton’s Laws of Motion
  • Understand how inertia, gravity, friction, mass and force affect motion
  • Make predictions for a new investigation using data from a previous investigation
  • Recognize different characteristics that categorize all living things into their kingdoms and give examples of each
  • Explain and practice nonviolent, positive behaviors for resolving conflict
  • Explain refusal and negotiation to use in potentially harmful or dangerous situations (e.g. refusal to use illegal drugs)
  • Understand the concept of air pressure and the factors that affect it
  • Understand what causes wind and what determines wind direction

Language Arts

  • Read aloud narrative and expository text fluently with appropriate pacing, intonation, and expression
  • Use a variety of strategies to determine meaning and increase vocabulary
  • Use strategies to spell words
  • Recognize the abstract, derived roots and affixes from Greek and Latin and use this knowledge to determine unfamiliar words
  • Understand the difference between connotation and denotation
  • Use pre-reading strategies and text features to aid in comprehension
  • Discern main ideas and concepts presented in prose and identify and assess supporting evidence
  • Make inferences, conclusions, or generalizations about a text and support them with a variety of evidence
  • Read a variety of literary and informational texts and identify features of each
  • Compare and contrast similarities and differences of literary characters (motives and actions), settings and events
  • Understand that theme refers to the meaning or moral of a selection and recognize reoccurring themes in various works
  • Describe the effect of common literary devices
  • Identify cause-and-effect relationships in literary texts
  • Describe how an author’s purpose and author’s perspective influence a given text
  • Introduce first-person and third-person points of view
  • Understand how conflicts are resolved in a story
  • Identify characteristics of persuasive text
  • Distinguish between poetry and prose and write formula poems and free-form poems
  • Read and organize information from multiple sources for various Compose narratives that establish and develop a plot, setting, theme and conclusion.
  • Compose narrative responses to literature.
  • Write a research report. Research and report topic, idea or issue should feature facts, details and examples from several authorities, and include a bibliography and citations that follows a recognized format. (e.g., MLA, APA).
  • Create a logical and effective organizational pattern appropriate to descriptive, narrative, expository and persuasive writing
  • Write persuasive letters or compositions.
  • Identify and use grammar correctly in writing and speaking
  • Practice proofreading skills to correct convention errors in mechanics, usage, punctuation, and spelling using a dictionary, thesaurus, and assessment rubric
  • Revise the draft by following an assessment rubric to further develop a piece of writing
  • Exhibit appropriate listening and asking relevant questions when applicable
  • Deliver narrative presentations. Interact with peers to develop and present familiar ideas centering on a situation, plot and point of view.

Social Studies

  • Explain that historical events are subject to different interpretations based on the observer’s knowledge and perceptions of an event
  • Distinguish between primary and secondary sources of information and classifies different examples of primary and secondary historical sources
  • Explain that the Western Hemisphere is composed of the continents of North and South America, connected by Central America, and that each continent consists of independent countries
  • Examine general patterns and processes of migration and diffusion in the Western Hemisphere
  • Name examples of the various resources found in the Western Hemisphere
  • Use correct geographical terminology to describe all types of maps globes, various charts, and other geographical tools
  • Demonstrate the ability to use geographical tools appropriately and interpret data from resources
  • Use terminology and data to create charts, graphs, or labeled maps
  • Compare and contrast the topography, resources, major population centers, and climatic zones of major physical regions in the Western Hemisphere
  • Identify and labels fifty U. S. states and capitols
  • Explain how forces inside the earth and on its surface affect the shape of the United States
  • Analyze the impact of the geographical features and their effects on the expansion of the United States
  • Analyze maps to identify and draw conclusions about the relationship among topography, resources, climate, and population patterns in the United States
  • Identify original descendants throughout the United States, their various cultures and lifestyles, and major contributions
  • Relate basis in Catholic Church to the United States’ family life, structure, and rule in culture
  • Identify the locations and origins of Catholic settlements in the United States